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''The Battle of the Somme'' by Philip Gibbs  <br />(Literary Digest, 1917)''The Battle of the Somme'' by Philip Gibbs
(Literary Digest, 1917)
This book review was published in an American magazine shortly after President Wilson and the U.S. Congress declared war on the Germany. The book in question, THE BATTLE of the SOMME, was written by Philip Gibbs (1877 - 1962). Highly respected among his peers and the reading public, Gibbs was knighted for his efforts at the war's end but soon he let the world know what he really thought of the war and, in particular, his feelings concerning General Douglas Haig.

Gibbs wrote a number of books that were critical of war, click here to read a review of More That Must Be Told (1921).

Good and Bad Writing About World War I <br />(Vanity Fair, 1915)Good and Bad Writing About World War I
(Vanity Fair, 1915)
A small column from a 1915 issue of VANITY FAIR in which the correspondent praised the virtues of Howard Copeland (an American psychologist and ambulance volunteer working in Frabce), Gertrude Aldrich (author of an ATALNTIC MAGAZINE essay titled, "Little House on the Marne"), Cardinal Mercier (author of the Great Belgian Pastoral) and W.F. Bailey (authored a paper concerning the war in Northeastern Europe). These writers are preferred to the usually celebrated ink-slingers like Hellaire Belloc, Rudyard Kipling, Anatole France, and Arnold Bennett who are all compared to amateur recruiting sergeants in support of the War.

This image file is poorly scanned: we recommend that you print it for greater legibility.

An Austrian at the German Supreme Headquarters <br />(Times Literary Supplement, 1921)An Austrian at the German Supreme Headquarters
(Times Literary Supplement, 1921)
Reviewed herein is the W.W. memoir of General von Josef Graf Sturgkh (1859 - 1916) memoir recalling his days in Berlin serving as the Austrian Army delegate to the German military's "Great Headquarters" (1915 - 1916):

"Graf Sturgkh drops several hints about the very heavy losses incurred by the Germans in the very first weeks of the war..."

The War-Poetry of the Soldier-Poets <br />(The English Review, 1921)The War-Poetry of the Soldier-Poets
(The English Review, 1921)
"Soldier poets are the true historians of the war. Unlike the host of professional versifers who sat up day and night on Parnasus, pouring out their patriotic zeal in allegorical rhymes of battles and batteries with more than Aesopian facility, the soldier poets have given to life and literature a genuine interpretation of warfare stripped bare of artificialty"

Patriotic Verse by Gertrude Stein <br />(Vanity Fair, 1918)Patriotic Verse by Gertrude Stein
(Vanity Fair, 1918)
When you stop to think of patriotic poetry, Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) is not one of the word-smiths whose name comes to mind. Yet she, too, applied her talents to the genre after having labored many moons as an ambulance driver in France on behalf of the American Fund for the French Wounded. She had joined this group in 1916 and in 1922 was awarded the Medaille de la Reconnaissance Française for all her good work. This poem, in praise of the U.S. Army, appeared in a 1918 VANITY FAIR.
Israel Zangwill and the Great War <br />(The North American Review, 1916)Israel Zangwill and the Great War
(The North American Review, 1916)
Israel Zangwill (1864 - 1926) was a member of the Jewish literary society in Britain; he was an prominent lecturer, journalist, novelist and playwright. Today, however, he is mostly remembered for his efforts on behalf of the Zionist movement to establish a Jewish homeland. The following is a luke-warm book review from 1916 covering his collection of essays about World War I, The War for the World.
<i>Three Soldiers</i> by Dos Passos <br />(Current Opinion, 1921)Three Soldiers by Dos Passos
(Current Opinion, 1921)
A magazine review of the classic American World War One novel, Three Soldiers by John Dos Passos.

"This book is vivid, but not sentimental. It does not contain a description of a single battle. What it does describe is the transformation of minds and bodies under the stress of war."

H.L. Mencken  Reviewed Two Novels Dealing the War and Disillusionment  <br />(The Smart Set, 1922)H.L. Mencken Reviewed Two Novels Dealing the War and Disillusionment
(The Smart Set, 1922)
"In Three Soldiers, John Dos Passos exhibited the disillusionment of the soldiers in the field; The Last Mile by Frank Macallister exposes the disillusionment of the soldier come home". The reviewer remarked that both men had been "bamboozled by Woodrow and company".
''Men in War'' by Andreas Latzko <br />(Current Opinion, 1918)''Men in War'' by Andreas Latzko
(Current Opinion, 1918)
In the bad-old days of World War I, author Andreas Latzko (1876 - 1943) served as a line officer in the Austro-Hungarian Army. While at the front he was affected by the horrors of combat until he found that he had seen enough and chose to desert. Even before the war had ended he managed to create an anti-war novel and get it to press before the Armistice. Digitized here is the 1918 review of his book, MEN IN WAR

"Disillusionment and an almost morbid sympathy with mental and physical suffering are outstanding features of the book."

 Another War Correspondent Remembers With Anger <br />(Current Opinion, 1921) Another War Correspondent Remembers With Anger
(Current Opinion, 1921)
American journalist Frederick Palmer (1873 - 1958) began his career as a correspondent covering the Greco-Turkish War (1896 - 1897); by the time the First World War flared up his stock was at it's very peak and and was selected by the British Government to serve as the sole American reporter to cover the efforts of the B.E.F.. In the Spring of 1917, when the U.S. entered the war, Palmer was recruited by the American Army to serve as the press liaison officer for General Pershing. A good deal of Palmer's experiences can be gleaned from this article, which was written as a review of his wartime memoirs, The Folly of Nations (1921).
The Enormous Room by E.E. Cummings <br />(Life Magazine, 1922)The Enormous Room by E.E. Cummings
(Life Magazine, 1922)
This is a short, pithy review of E.E. Cummings' (1894 – 1962) 1922 novel, The Enormous Room, which was based upon his experience as an American volunteer ambulance driver and his subsequent incarceration in a French jail for having admitted to pacifist sympathies. The reviewer believed that the book provided:

"the last word in realistically detailed horrors."

F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked:

"Of all the work by young men who have sprung up since 1920 one book survives - 'The Enormous Room' by E.E. Cummings".

CARRY ON by Coningsby Dawson <br />(NY Times, 1917)CARRY ON by Coningsby Dawson
(NY Times, 1917)
Attached, you will find the 1917 review of CARRY ON by Coningsby Dawson (1883 - 1959). The book is a collection of the author's beautifully crafted letters that were written to his family while he served on the Western Front during the First World War. Dawson's ability to convey the urgency of the allied cause was so well received he was assigned to write two additional books by the British Ministry of Information: "The Glory of the Trenches" and "Out to Win", both published in 1918 (neither of the two were anywhere near as moving as the volume one that is reviewed here.)

Click here to read about W.W. I art.

Sergeant York's Side of the Story <br />(Literary Digest, 1922)Sergeant York's Side of the Story
(Literary Digest, 1922)
A large part of the American publicity machine has always involved the creation of a memoir; attached herein is the LITERARY DIGEST review of the World War One memoir of American war hero Sergeant Alvin York (1887 - 1964): Sergeant York and His People.

To read an account of Sergeant York's deification in Gotham, click HERE.

All Quiet on the Western Front <br />(Saturday Review of Literature, 1929)All Quiet on the Western Front
(Saturday Review of Literature, 1929)
Henry Seidel Canby (1878 - 1961) was one of the founding editors of THE SATURDAY REVIEW OF LITERATURE and in this article he put pen to paper and presented his readers with a concise summation of what he liked to call "the five phases" of war literature. Canby sensed that since 1919 there had been five unique types of war books, all produced by veterans, and that Erich Maria Remarque's (1898 – 1970) ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT was typical of the fifth variety that was appearing in 1929:

"The balance hangs true in Remarque. Pacifism is a theory, militarism is a theory, war is a necessity - not in its causes, for who really hates the enemy! - but for this doomed generation it is a fact. War for these men is normal, which does not mean that they like it."

A 1930 article about the movie can be read herecan be read here.

In Memorium, 1914 <br />(Saturday Review of Literature, 1929)In Memorium, 1914
(Saturday Review of Literature, 1929)
The editors for the August 3, 1929 issue of THE SATURDAY REVIEW OF LITERATURE removed their collective caps in deep solemnity for the disasters that began that week just fifteen years earlier when the opening shots were fired that began the First World War.

It was a fitting tribute coming from a literary magazine in 1929, for that would be the year that introduced some of the finest World War I books to the reading public: Undertones of War (Blunden), The Path of Glory (Blake) and All Quiet on the Western Front (Remarque), which are all mentioned herein.

Prisoner of War <br />(Saturday Review of Literature, 1932)Prisoner of War
(Saturday Review of Literature, 1932)
THE SATURDAY REVIEW of LITERATURE discussed a number of World War One books while in the course of reviewing Shoot And Be Damned by Ed Halyburton and Ralph Goll, a wartime memoir which recalled time spent in a German prisoner of war camp.
JOURNEY'S END by R.C. Sheriff <br />(Theatre Arts Magazine, 1929)JOURNEY'S END by R.C. Sheriff
(Theatre Arts Magazine, 1929)
Robert Littell reviewed the first New York production of "Journey's End" by former infantry officer, R.C. Sherriff (1896 – 1975: 9th East Surrey Regiment, 1915 - 1918). We have also included a paragraph from a British critic named W.A. Darlington (The Daily Telegraph theatre critic: 1920 to 1968) who had once fought in the trenches and approaches the drama from the angle of a veteran:

"The curtain rose - and instantly I was taken back into the very atmosphere of the trenches..."

Click here if you would like to read another article about the WW I play "Journeys End".

The Pessimism That Followed W.W. I   <br />(Atlantic Monthly, 1923)The Pessimism That Followed W.W. I
(Atlantic Monthly, 1923)
A few years after the Great War reached it's bloody conclusion, literary critic Helen McAfee discovered that a careful reading of the prominent authors and poets writing between 1918 and 1923 revealed that each of them shared a newfound sense of malaise - a despairing, pessimistic voice that was not found in their pre-war predecessors.

"Certainly the most striking dramatization of this depth of confusion and bitterness is Mr. Eliot's The Waste Land. As if by flashes of lightening it reveals the wreck of the storm... The poem is written in the Expressionist manner - a manner peculiarly adapted to the present temper... It is mood more than idea that gives the poem its unity. And the mood is black. It is bitter as gall; not only with a personal bitterness, but also with the bitterness of a man facing a world devastated by a war for a peace without ideals."

If you would like to read another 1920s article about the disillusioned post-war spirit, click here.

T.E. Lawrence of Arabia  <br />(Saturday Review of Literature, 1930)T.E. Lawrence of Arabia
(Saturday Review of Literature, 1930)
This is a 1930 review of of Gurney Slade's fictionalized account of the World War One Arab revolt, In Lawrence's Bodyguard. The book was intended as a novel for boys and is here reviewed anonymously by one who was simply credited as, "A Friend of T.E. Lawrence". Gurney Slade (pen name for Stephen Bartlett) was libeled as "a man of taste and sensibility" and the novel was generally well liked.

"'The Arab business was a freak in my living; in ordinary times I'm plumb normal.' Normal, yes; but only the normally strong arise to be normal after trial and error."

You might also like to read this 1933 article about T.E. Lawrence.

Click here to read about Lawrence's posthumous memoir and the literary coup of 1935.

Baron Fritz & No Hard Feelings <br />(Saturday Review of Literature, 1930)Baron Fritz & No Hard Feelings
(Saturday Review of Literature, 1930)
SATURDAY REVIEW correspondent Emerson G. Taylor reviewed two World War One books: Baron Fritz by Dante scholar Karl Federn, which he liked, and No Hard Feelings, by Medal of Honor recipient John Lewis Barkley, which he did not:

"In this week's other narrative of soldier's life, John Lewis Barkley, late Corporal, K Company, 4th United States Infantry, tells the world that he and his gang were exceedingly tough 'hombres', that, in the Second Battle of the Marne and in the Meuse Argonne operations, he killed a vast number of bloodthirsty Germans with his trusty rifle, by serving a machine-gun, or with a pistol and a knife, that he was profusely decorated, was always in the fore-front of duty and danger, and spent a furlough in Paris with Marie...Ho-hum."

New From Amazon: Doughboys on the Great War:
How American Soldiers Viewed Their Military Experience

''Company K'' by William March <br />(Saturday Review of Literature, 1933)''Company K'' by William March
(Saturday Review of Literature, 1933)
THE NEW YORK TIMES war correspondent Arthur Ruhl (1876-1935) reviewed a book that would later be seen as a classic piece of World War One fiction: Company K by William March (born William Edward Campbell 1893 – 1954). Awarded both the French Croix de Guerre and the Distinguished Service Cross, March gained an understanding of war and the frailties of human character as a member of the Fifth Marines fighting at Belleau Wood and participating in the big push during the San-Mihiel Offensive:

"The outstanding virtues of William March's work are those of complete absence of sentimentality and routine romanticism, of a dramatic gift constantly heightened and sharpened by eloquence of understatement."

The W.W. I Plays of the Post-War Years <br />(Stage Magazine, 1933) The W.W. I Plays of the Post-War Years
(Stage Magazine, 1933)
A look at "What Price Glory?" and "Journey's End" and the new spirit that created these dramas.

"When R.C. Sheriff, nearly ten years after the Armistice, sat down to write an easy play for the amateurs of his boat club, he seems to have had no fixed notion as to what a play ought to be. The script of "Journey's End" shows a complete absence of strain..."

Click here to read an additional article concerning "Journeys End".

A Visit to the Grave of Rupert Brooke <br />(The London Mercury, 1920)A Visit to the Grave of Rupert Brooke
(The London Mercury, 1920)
Attached is an account by a learned traveler who journeyed to that one piece of ground on the isle of Skyros that will forever be England - the grave of the English poet Rupert Brooke (1887 - 1915). The literati who wrote the attached article went to great lengths imparting the significance of Skyros throughout all antiquity and it's meaning to the world of letters - credited only as "S. Casson", he informed his readers that he arrived on the island five years after the 1915 internment in order to erect the headstone that is currently in place, describing the shepherds and other assorted rustics in some detail while alluding tirelessly to the works of Homer.
'No More Parades' by Ford Madox Ford <br />(Literary Digest, 1926)'No More Parades' by Ford Madox Ford
(Literary Digest, 1926)
The attached article is a 1926 review of Ford Madox Ford's (1873 - 1939) novel, No More Parades, his second in a series of four related novels concerning the Great War. Billed as "the most highly praised novel of the year", the reviewer lapses into superlatives and exults:

"Not since 'Three Soldiers' has a novel of the war made such an impression on reviewers as Ford Madox Ford's 'No More Parades'...All our 'intellectuals' are reading it...our young intellectual novelists will be heavily influenced by it or will attempt to imitate a whole-cloth imitation of it."

Ford was a veteran of the war who served with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers; the article is illustrated with a black and white photo of the author standing shoulder to shoulder with Ezra Pound and James Joyce.

A Review of Two W.W. I Books <br />(The Dial Magazine, 1919)A Review of Two W.W. I Books
(The Dial Magazine, 1919)
DIAL editor Robert Morss Lovett compared and contrasted two very different First World War memoirs in this article: America in France by Frederick Palmer (1873 - 1958) and Floyd Gibbons' (1887 - 1939) "And They Thought We Wouldn't Fight".

A War Correspondent Remembers With Anger <br />(Current Opinion, 1922)A War Correspondent Remembers With Anger
(Current Opinion, 1922)
A single paragraph review of Sir Philip Gibbs' (1877 - 1962) book, More That Must Be Told. The book was written as a sequel to his previous volume which cataloged the many blunders and assorted outrages of the Great War, Now It Can Be Told (1920). The reviewer wrote:

"There is much that is stirring and much that is contradictory in Sir Philip's new book. At one moment he fiercely attacks the 'old gang" by this term he means 'the leaders of Europe, still for the most part in control of the machinery of government".

 German Cavalry Memoir <br />(Leslie's Weekly, 1915) German Cavalry Memoir
(Leslie's Weekly, 1915)
Fritz Arno Wagner (1894 - 1958) is best remembered as a pioneering cinematographer from the earliest days of the German film industry, however before he could gain the experiences necessary to become the director of photography for such films as "Nosferatu", and "Westfront" he had to first fulfill his obligations to the Kaiser. This article is an account of his brief stint in the Hussars (ie. lancers) that he gave to the editor's of "Leslie's Illustrated Weekly Newspaper". Although the article only covers his training period, it does give the reader a sense of what life was like for an enlisted man serving in one of highly prized regiments in the Imperial German Army.

It is believed that this magazine article was written during his days with Pathe News in New York.

Click here to read about the U.S. Navy railroad artillery of W.W. I.

Father Francis Duffy of the Fighting 69th  <br />(The Bookman, 1920)Father Francis Duffy of the Fighting 69th
(The Bookman, 1920)
Father Francis P. Duffy (1874 - 1932) was the well-loved regimental chaplain for the illustrious, old New York infantry regiment known as "the Fighting 69th".
Next time you find yourself walking near Times Square in New York City, you'll see a statue erected in his memory situated behind a statue of the popular songster who composed "Over There" - George M. Cohan (1878 - 1942). These memorials will be found at Broadway and 7th Avenue (between 46th & 47th streets). Both men knew the neighborhood well - to Cohan it was known as the "Theater District" while Duffy knew it as "Hell's Kitchen", and it was his parish.

"The Bookman" reviewed Duffy's memoir as "a book which carries A.E.F. readers back to lousy, old French barns, to chilly, soupy Argonne mud and, at last, to a wintry Rhineland...".

You can can read more about Father Duffy's war here...

Click here to read articles about W.W. I poetry.

An Englishman in the French Army <br />(Times Literary Supplement, 1917)An Englishman in the French Army
(Times Literary Supplement, 1917)
"Under the French Flag" is a W.W. I memoir by M. Macdonald in which the author tells the story of an Englishman who chose to sign up for the French Army due to their lax recruiting regulations which provided for the enlistment of men as old as fifty years of age. The reviewer believed the author recounted some interesting scenes of early-war France and French barracks life.

Click here to read articles about W.W. I poetry.

The Field Service of the American Ambulace <br />(Times Literary Supplement, 1917)The Field Service of the American Ambulace
(Times Literary Supplement, 1917)
A book review from Britain's controlled press of "Friends of France". Printed in 1917, the book was a collection of memoirs by the members of the Field Service of the American Ambulance.

Click here to read about the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps.

Ludendorff's Apology <br />(The Nation, 1920)Ludendorff's Apology
(The Nation, 1920)
A second and far more thorough book review of "My Story", by German General Erich von Ludendorff (1865 - 1937).

"When the bitterness of these days has passed, historians will very likely classify Ludendorff as first among the military geniuses of his time. But his 'Own Story' will have importance principally because of certain sidelights it casts upon his motives and psychology."

A shorter review of Ludendorff's memoir can be read here.

Read about Ludendorff's collusion with Hitler...

General Von Ludendorff Defends Himself  <br />(The Dial Magazine, 1920)General Von Ludendorff Defends Himself
(The Dial Magazine, 1920)
Attached is a review of Von Ludendorff's memoir entitled, "My Own Story", as it appeared in a much admired journal of the arts.

"'Ludendorf's Own Story' by Erich Friedrich Von Ludendorff gives a G.H.Q. view of the war from August 1914 to November 1918. It has a certain quality of forthrightness which makes its fallacies and mistakes apparent to the reader even when they escape the author. Ludendorff's thesis is that the war was lost because the the army at home had not another Ludendorff to direct it..."

In 1920 the representatives from the victorious nations who convened at Versailles demanded that Kaiser Wilhelm, General Ludendorf and an assortment of various other big shots be handed over for trial - click here to read about it.

A longer review of Ludendorff's memoir from THE NATION can be read here.

Read about Ludendorff's
collusion with Hitler...

A Review of Grand Admiral Von Tirpitz Memoir <br />(The Dial Magazine, 1920)A Review of Grand Admiral Von Tirpitz Memoir
(The Dial Magazine, 1920)
The well respected arts journal, THE DIAL, published a very brief notice reviewing the post-war memoir, My Memoirs, of Admiral Alfred Von Tirpitz (1849-1930). The Dial reviewer found the Von Tirpitz' memoir interesting as a psychological study:

"'My Memoirs', by Grand Admiral von Tirpitz is one of those elaborate vindications which carry the authentic conviction of guilt...If Germany was really, as the Grand Admiral estimates, a sheep in wolf's clothing, a few more memoirs like this will leave no regret about her fate."

Read an article about the many faults of the German Navy during the Second World War...

 Review of Kaiser Welhelm's Memoir <br />(The Spectator, 1922) Review of Kaiser Welhelm's Memoir
(The Spectator, 1922)
Surprisingly, a British magazine published a terribly dry and unsympathetic review of My Memoirs by Kaiser Welhelm II (1859 - 1941).

In 1920 the representatives from the victorious nations who convened at Versailles demanded that Kaiser Wilhelm, Admiral Tirpitz and an assortment of other big shots be handed over for trial - click here to read about it.

Click here to read what the Kaiser thought of Adolf Hitler.

Another article about the despondency in 1920s Germany can be read here...

From Amazon: My Memoirs: 1878-1918

A Review of the Memoir by the Crown Prince <br />(The New Republic, 1922)A Review of the Memoir by the Crown Prince
(The New Republic, 1922)
The book reviewer for THE NEW REPUBLIC, Sidney B. Fay, summed-up his reading of the dethroned Crown Prince's (1882 - 1951) post-war memoir in this way:

"This is a remarkable book in at least three respects: it's literary cleverness, it's revelation of a new Crown Prince chastened by adversity, and it's vivid pictures of men and events."

Recalling Two of the War's Blunders <br />(The English Review, 1920)Recalling Two of the War's Blunders
(The English Review, 1920)
Added to the growing pile of reviews that attempted to sort out all the various explanations as to why the war went so badly for practically all the nations involved was this 1920 article that presented a clear description of the 1914 drive on Paris as well as the disaster that was the Gallipoli campaign.

The books reviewed were penned by two of the war's principal players: The March on Paris by General Alexander Von Kluck (1846-1934) and Gallipoli Diary by General Sir Ian Hamilton (1853-1957).

"The story of the German onrush and it's memorable check can now be pieced together with accuracy. It tallies with the account of General Sir Frederick Maurice. We now know that the Germans failed through want of General Staff control, through inadequate "intelligence", above all, through striking at two fronts at the same time."

A Veteran Against War <br />(Rob Wagner's Script Magazine, 1938)A Veteran Against War
(Rob Wagner's Script Magazine, 1938)
Writer Paul Gerard Smith (1894 – 1968) was a U.S. Marine in World War I and in 1938, when he saw that another war with Germany was simmering on the the front burner he put a Fresh ribbon of ink in the typewriter and wrote this editorial which he titled, An Open Letter to Boys of Military Age. His column is a cautionary tale advising the young men of his day to make their decisions thoughtfully before committing themselves to such a dangerous undertaking as war. Smith advised youth to examine the causes for the war, verify whose commercial interests will be served in victory and only if -

"you find that America and the future of America is threatened - then go and kick Hell of the enemy, and God be with you."

Click here to read an article about the German veterans of W.W. I.

CLICK HERE... to read one man's account of his struggle with shell shock...

''A Brass Hat in No Man's Land'' - Reviewed by Robert Graves <br />(Now & Then, 1930)''A Brass Hat in No Man's Land'' - Reviewed by Robert Graves
(Now & Then, 1930)
War poet Robert Graves was assigned the task of reviewing the W.W. I memoir A Brass Hat in No Man's Land by the English General F.P. Crozier and came away liking it very much: "It is the only account of fighting on the Western Front that I have been able to read with sustained interest and respect." Crozier's memoir did not spare the reader any details involving the nastier side of the war; he reported on "trench suicides", self-inflicted wounds and mutinies:

"My experience of war, which is a prolonged one, is that anything may happen in it from the highest kinds of chivalry and sacrifice to the very lowest forms of barbaric debasement."

From Amazon: The Lie About the War by General Douglas Jerrold

A Brass Hat in No Man's Land

Click here to read the 1918 interview with General Hindenburg in which he declared that the Germans lost the war as a result of the American Army.

Siegfried Sassoon on the Soldier Poets  <br />(Vanity Fair, 1920)Siegfried Sassoon on the Soldier Poets
(Vanity Fair, 1920)
The following five page article was written by the World War I poet, Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967), in an

"attempt to give a rough outline of what the British poets did in the Great War, making every allowance for the fact that they were writing under great difficulty...".

Sassoon gave a thorough going-over of every war poet that he admired, naming at least twenty. It is a wonderful and revealing read for all those who have come to admire the poets of the First World War and Sigfried Sassoon in particular.

Click here to read additional articles about W.W. I poetry.

Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man <br />(The Bookman, 1929)Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man
(The Bookman, 1929)
Heartlessly torn from the brittle pages of a 1929 issue of THE BOOKMAN was this summary and review of MEMOIRS OF A FOX HUNTING MAN by Sigfried Sassoon:

"'Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man', it sounds comfortable, out of doors, Victorian; it seems to belong on a shelf in a library hung with pictures of beloved horses; it does not suggest the Sassoon of 1917 and 1918."

"During the war something was lost to Englishmen which they can recapture in nostalgic memories but never recover in fact. This strange novel of Sassoon's reminds one of the faintly faded colors and old-fashioned security of English sporting prints."

"It is a charming, sober-hued book, full of the peaceful solidities of days spent with ploughed fields, sweating horses and simple, friendly men for whom the fox and the hound are all that life holds most worth while...After many tranquil chapters never very far from the stirrups, the war swallows up our fox-hunting man. But he remains calm to the end, which is hardly an end, but more like a semicolon. Somehow the healthy weariness, the the outdoor magic of those years of fox-hunting persist even under bombardment.