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Paul Tibbets of the ENOLA GAY <br />(Yank Magazine, 1945)Paul Tibbets of the ENOLA GAY
(Yank Magazine, 1945)
A one page interview with Paul Tibbets (1915 2007) and the crew of the ENOLA GAY as they recounted their historic mission over Hiroshima during the closing days of World War Two. Paul Tibbets remained in uniform long after the war and eventually retired as an Air Force General. When he died during the fall of 2007 it was revealed that he preferred there not be a memorial service, nor any marker identifying his grave in order to deprive protesters of a staging ground. His ashes were sprinkled over the North Atlantic.

What if the Atomic Bomb had never been invented? When would the war have ended?

The Bombers Speak <br />(Coronet Magazine, 1960)The Bombers Speak
(Coronet Magazine, 1960)
Appearing in a 1960 issue of CORONET MAGAZINE was this piece that revealed the assorted introspective perceptions of the crew of the Enola Gay.

In the fifteen years that had past since the dropping of the Atomic bomb these are the personal thoughts that were produced after years of sober reflection concerning their part in one of the preeminent events of the last century:

"After 15 years the scene over Hiroshima is still sharp and clear to them, and though they disagree on details, they are unanimous on the point of whether they'd do the same things again".

The Crew of the Enola Gay Fifteen Years Later   <br />(Coronet Magazine, 1960)The Crew of the Enola Gay Fifteen Years Later
(Coronet Magazine, 1960)
A collection of thumbnail portraits that outline what each crew member did on that August day, and what they were doing fifteen years afterward.

This article was partially written in order to squelch the spreading rumors that reported that the atomic bomber crews from 1945 had all slowly gone mad.

"The men of the Enola Gay were hand-picked experts, chosen for intelligence, emotional stability and discipline, qualities they have put to good use in their post-war careers. Four remained in the service (one died in 1953) and the others are all successful in their business carees. They earn above-average salaries, all but one are married and they have 26 children among them. None of them has been to Japan since the war, and few have met since separation."